The Auckland Maori Housing Summit - Media Release

24 April 2018

 

Summit Welcomes Government Commitment to Improving Housing Outcomes for Maori in Auckland

 

The Auckland Māori Housing Summit has welcomed the government’s commitment to a national housing strategy but says the two years that it will take to develop a strategy is too long for some Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau to wait.

 

The Summit was hosted by Te Matapihi he tirohanga mō te iwi Trust (Te Matapihi), and supported by the Independent Māori Statutory Board (IMSB). The Minister of Housing and Urban Development, Hon Phil Twyford, addressed the Summit, speaking in depth about the governments housing programme in Auckland, and how that is expected to deliver outcomes for Māori and Auckland. The Minister of Māori Development and Local Government, Hon Nanaia Mahuta, illustrated the way in which housing can be viewed from a Māori Development perspective, most notably by transforming the conceptual approach to housing into kāinga, and through planning and development which is community based and community informed.

 

Te Matapihi chairman, Rau Hoskins, said that many iwi leaders attending the Summit supported the government developing a specific iwi focussed housing strategy to deal with the particular Māori housing issues in Auckland.

 

“While we accept that the housing crisis in Tāmaki has been 30 years in the making and won’t be fixed in the first term of this government, we do need to address the housing needs of Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau now, like those paying $525 a week in rent for a 1 bedroom flat, to the coach surfing whānau,” Mr Hoskins said.

 

Housing Minister Phil Twyford acknowledged the seriousness of the housing crisis for Auckland Māori, agreeing that Māori had been hammered by a decline in home ownership over decades which had undermined the main way that whānau had accumulated assets.

 

Housing Minister Phil Twyford acknowledged the seriousness of the housing crisis for Auckland Māori, saying that Māori had been hammered by a decline in home ownership over decades which had undermined the main way that whanau had accumulated assets.

 

Mr Twyford said his government shared the view that Māori needed a place to call home and the certainty of belonging from a place Māori could call their own.  He said it was his government’s ambition to deliver housing solutions in partnership with Māori rather than policies that acted on Māori from above.

 

Mr Twyford said he is committed to working with Māori and iwi leaders to develop a serious Māori housing strategy with practical goals and with resources to back the strategy up, “to hold the government accountable”.

 

Both Ministers told delegates, who included Māori housing providers, iwi leaders, government officials, and community groups, bold action was needed to resolve the housing situation for Auckland Māori, including transformative polices for the 21st Century.

 

Mr Hoskins said a key area of discussion was how urban Māori would be affected by the government's KiwiBuild plan, Labour’s flagship housing policy, now government commitment, to build 100,000 houses over ten years including 50,000 in Auckland.

Mr Hoskins said there were no specific numbers on how urban Māori would benefit from the 50,000 homes the government is planning to build in Auckland over the next ten years.However, he said Summit delegates were confident Māori would benefit from the policy.

 

"I think there's a reasonable expectation that in KiwiBuild that iwi and Māori will have a big part to play both in the design and the development of those projects but also the occupation of the dwellings."

 

Another Auckland Māori Housing Summit will be held in around six months time.

 

ENDS

 

 

 

Further Information Contact:

Wayne Knox | Lead Advisor - Policy & Engagement

P: 021 911 244 or E: wayne@tematapihi.org.nz