HLC Mana Whenua Flyer

HLC (Homes. Land. Community) has provided this public flyer, intended for ngā mana whenua groups of Tāmaki Makaurau, extending information regarding their vision for and capability to co-provide community housing alongside treaty partners of Tāmaki Makaurau. HLC have a strong focus on Māori housing needs moving forward, ensuring that a variety of positive community-based outcomes are reinforced holistically through prospective housing projects.

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A Guide to Papakāinga Housing

This booklet is a guide to whānau papakāinga housing available to you, your whānau and community. This guide sets out a step-by-step process to assist whānau to plan for and complete papakāinga housing on Māori Freehold and in some cases General Land, with checklists, tips, advice and case studies to progress your papakāinga housing development as a six step approach.

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Case study: Māori housing movements in Progressive Thinking: Ten Perspectives on Housing

The papakāinga movement has been fundamental to Māori asserting their right to reoccupy their whenua and live as Māori. Recognising the need for housing to provide more than just an individual roof, papakāinga are built on a philosophy of values: manaakitanga, kaitiakitanga, wairuatanga, whānaungatanga. This article features in Progressive thinking: ten perspectives on housing, published by the Public Service Association of New Zealand.

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Opinion - Patrick Gemmell

Kāinga Whenua is a kind of a translation of its English counterpart, Welcome Home Loans, with both housing products being administered by the Crown agent, Housing New Zealand and financed by Kiwibank. In its seven years of operation, the Kāinga Whenua has delivered less than 30 home loans, that is, just over four homes per year. This article features in the "Responding to Homelessness in Aotearoa New Zealand" October 2017 edition of Parity Magazine.

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Measuring iterative homelessness in mental health in Aotearoa New Zealand

Despite recent media attention around the issue of homelessness and a lack of appropriate social housing, there appears to be little consideration of the relationship between mental health and homelessness in Aotearoa New Zealand. Using data collected by Statistics New Zealand and the National Programme for Integrated Mental Health Data (PRIMHD), this article discusses some of the challenges in measuring iterative homelessness for tangata whaiora in Aotearoa. This article features in the "Responding to Homelessness in Aotearoa New Zealand" October 2017 edition of Parity Magazine.

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Elderly at 43: On health and homelessness

At 43, Niko is an old man. He spends his nights at the rear corner of an inner-city, open-air carpark, where exhaust fumes leak through the tears in his tarpaulin. He eats dry packets of two-minute noodles for breakfast, and relies on donated food at the Auckland City Mission's Homeless Community Drop-in Centre for dinner. When it rains, Niko's feet get wet and stay wet for days. This latter fact is what led him to the Mission's Calder Health Centre last winter. This article features in the "Responding to Homelessness in Aotearoa New Zealand" October 2017 edition of Parity Magazine.

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Easy access housing: Transitional and emergency housing for homeless Tangata Whaiora

A one-of-a-kind service for homeless tangata whaiora with mental health and addiction issues has operated in Wellington since the early 2,000s. Easy Access Housing (EAH) provides a transitional (six-month) or emergency (three-month) shared-housing service. Intrinsic supports that empower tangata whaiora to seek and gain longer-term housing is included in the service model that provides a unique approach in Aotearoa/New Zealand. This article features in the "Responding to Homelessness in Aotearoa New Zealand" October 2017 edition of Parity Magazine.

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Housing Northland's homeless: From crisis to confidence

In 2006, a collective of local churches combined to establish the Tai Tokerau Emergency Housing Charitable Trust (TTEHCT). This was in response to community-led research undertaken by One Double Five Community House that revealed a desperate need for emergency housing in Whangarei for up to twenty households.This article features in the "Responding to Homelessness in Aotearoa New Zealand" October 2017 edition of Parity Magazine.

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Tūrangawaewae: Whānau wellbeing for all

Central to this article is the premise that we do not have a housing crisis, we have a crisis affecting whanau wellbeing. Housing is just one of the many factors that impact whanau health and wellbeing. This article features in the "Responding to Homelessness in Aotearoa New Zealand" October 2017 edition of Parity Magazine.

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Is it a housing crisis or just housing pressure?

Monte Cecilia Housing Trust was established in 1982 by the St Vincent de Paul Society, Liston Foundation, the Sisters of Mercy and the Marist Brothers to provide emergency housing and practical assistance to families with a housing need. Our overall aim is to ensure a successful transition to independent housing so that families can better determine their own future. This article features in the "Responding to Homelessness in Aotearoa New Zealand" October 2017 edition of Parity Magazine.

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Responding to homelessness in New Zealand: Homelessness and housing first for Māori: Meaning and optimisation

The thesis of this article is that Māori therapeutic approaches, mātauranga, values and perspectives — and globally those of other Indigenous groups — offer mainstream social services rich opportunities through engagement, relationships and standing and reciprocal learning. This article features in the "Responding to Homelessness in Aotearoa New Zealand" October 2017 edition of Parity Magazine.

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Housing first: People working with people

In this article, we will explore the experiences of two key roles in the Housing First approach and hear the stories of Housing First staff on the ground in the New Zealand context. The following is an interview with Sonya Coop and Fiona Watene who belong to VisionWest’s Housing First team. This article features in the "Responding to Homelessness in Aotearoa New Zealand" October 2017 edition of Parity Magazine.

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