Housing first Auckland city centre programme: Responsiveness to Māori

Housing First, which provides rapid access to permanent housing with flexible community-based supports, works better than traditional approaches for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples who are experiencing chronic homelessness. However, Housing First needs to be adapted in order to achieve optimal results for Indigenous peoples. This article features in the "Responding to Homelessness in Aotearoa New Zealand" October 2017 edition of Parity Magazine.

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Auckland council's role in addressing homelessness

Auckland's rapid population growth presents many challenges including a major housing shortage as population growth exceeds housing supply and increases pressure on infrastructure. Homelessness is a growing reality in Auckland for many individuals and families, including those in employment. This article features in the "Responding to Homelessness in Aotearoa New Zealand" October 2017 edition of Parity Magazine.

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One housing first to rule them all?

New Zealand's use of Housing First is rapidly unfolding. He Kāinga Oranga in partnership with the People's Project and Waikato University have established a five year research programme on the delivery and outcomes achieved by Housing First in the New Zealand context. This article features in the "Responding to Homelessness in Aotearoa New Zealand" October 2017 edition of Parity Magazine.

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Responding to homelessness in Aotearoa New Zealand through home-grown best practice

To support people on their journey towards sustainable housing and hauora we have grappled hard with our practice model, reflecting as a team on what makes for 'best practice' in our context. In Aotearoa New Zealand, our sector would benefit from developing a shared agreement as to what constitutes best practice when working to end homelessness. This article features in the "Responding to Homelessness in Aotearoa New Zealand" October 2017 edition of Parity Magazine.

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Housing first Auckland: A collective impact approach to ending chronic homelessness in New Zealand's largest city

Housing First is a well-researched model with an ever-growing body of evidence showing its effectiveness in ending homelessness. In particular, it helps promote housing stability, reduce service use and improve quality of life.  This article features in the "Responding to Homelessness in Aotearoa New Zealand" October 2017 edition of Parity Magazine.

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Single women's homelessness in Aotearoa New Zealand

There is very little research on women's experience of homelessness in New Zealand.This article looks at the experience of single homeless women in Aotearoa New Zealand and looks at the specific service example of the Wellington Homeless Women's Trust. This article features in the "Responding to Homelessness in Aotearoa New Zealand" October 2017 edition of Parity Magazine.

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Towards the design of culturally-based supportive housing facilities

The recent increase in government funding for emergency housing and Housing First places, urban marae-based responses such as those rolled out by Te Puea and others, and the growing role of iwi in the provision of homelessness services, suggest that purpose-built culturally-based emergency, transitional and supportive housing facilities for Maori will be developed in the near future. The need for culturally informed design guidance is an emerging consideration. This article features in the "Responding to Homelessness in Aotearoa New Zealand" October 2017 edition of Parity Magazine.

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Te Ha Tangata: A human library on homelessness

This article offers one case study of the role of community in providing responses to homelessness in Aotearoa. In a unique 'human library' event, Te Puaroha Compassion Soup Kitchen, Kahungunu Whanau Services, Te Whakamura Ai Te Ahi and Massey University worked with people experiencing housing deprivation to deliver Te Ha Tangata - The Breath of the People. This article features in the "Responding to Homelessness in Aotearoa New Zealand" October 2017 edition of Parity Magazine.

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Kāinga tahi, kāinga rua: A kaupapa Māori Response of Te Puea Memorial Marae

In the winter of 2016, Te Puea Memorial Marae (TPMM) initiated a kaupapa Maori marae-led response, opening their doors to vulnerable whanau seeking emergency housing. In the full view of the media, TPMM not only made the reality of homelessness visible by caring for 181 people (of all ethnicities and cultural backgrounds), but named the housing situation in Auckland as a 'crisis'. This article features in the "Responding to Homelessness in Aotearoa New Zealand" October 2017 edition of Parity Magazine.

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Homeless Wāhine Māori and survival sex: An emerging link?

The absence of good quality data is a persistent issue, hindering policies from being appropriately targeted to the specific needs of minority groups. Despite making up a disproportionate percentage of those experiencing homelessness and housing insecurity, Maori women are one such underserviced group. This article features in the "Responding to Homelessness in Aotearoa New Zealand" October 2017 edition of Parity Magazine.

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Understanding homelessness in rural Aotearoa

Homelessness for whanau in Northland arises from a range of challenges. The government economic and housing agenda has been set by neo-liberal, utilitarian policy makers and while this may be working for majority of people in Aotearoa, this agenda means misery for the minority. This article features in the "Responding to Homelessness in Aotearoa New Zealand" October 2017 edition of Parity Magazine.

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Housing Needs of Native Hawaiians: A Report From the Assessment of American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Housing Needs

Based on a household survey conducted for this study plus decennial census and ACS data, this study compares Native Hawaiian households in Hawaii statewide to the subset of Native Hawaiian households eligible (household head must be at least 50 percent Native Hawaiian by blood quantum) to assume a lease on the Hawaiian home lands, which comprise more than 200,000 acres of trust land administered by the State of Hawaii’s Department of Hawaiian Home Lands (DHHL).

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UN Calls for Review of SHA 62 Designation

This article was published in the MASS e-newsletter, Pūtanga 71,  1 September 2017. 

Pania Newton and Delwyne Roberts of Ihumātao attended the 93rd Meeting of CERD in Geneva two weeks ago (in mid-August 2017), to put the grievance for SOUL, a mana whenua led campaign working to protect culturally, historically, spiritually and archaeologically significant land at Ihumātao.

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